Good Morning!

Good morning, it’s Thursday June 19, it’s going to be hot and cloudy, and it’s Juneteenth.

Gen. Gordon Granger (Library of Congress/file)

Good morning, it’s Thursday, June 19, the 170th day of 2014. There are 195 days left in the year. We’ll start the day with clouds and temperatures in the mid-70s and we’re expecting highs this afternoon in the lower 90s under a mostly cloudy sky. Overnight, temperatures will be in the lower 70s.

(Today’s Forecast And Conditions)

On June 19, 1865—149 years ago today--Gen. Gordon Granger landed at Galveston and issued a proclamation that declared slaves in Texas to be free three years after Congress passed and President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.

Granger’s message said, "The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere."

Large celebrations began the next year and eventually spread to neighboring states. Interest declined during World War II and again during the 1950s and 1960s, but in the 1970s observances were revived in some communities. Since 1980, June 19 has been observed as Emancipation Day in Texas, which is a state partial-staffing holiday.

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Today's Highlight in Local History:
On June 19, 1981, three teenagers drowned in Lake Mexia as sheriff’s deputies tried to transport across the lake in a 14-foot aluminum boat. Anthony Freeman, 18, Carl Baker, 19, and Steve Booker, 19, were arrested at a Juneteenth celebration at Booker T. Washington Park after authorities said a search of their car turned up marijuana and a syringe. The deputies claimed they removed the handcuffs from all three before putting them in the boat, but only two of the teens could swim. The deputies were later acquitted of negligent homicide charges by an all-white Dallas County jury. But the families of the three teenagers won a $15 million from Limestone County in 1983.
On June 19, 2003, the mother of Baylor basketball player Patrick Dennehy formally reported her son missing to Waco police.

Today's Highlight in History:
On June 19, 1964, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was approved by the U.S. Senate, 73-27, after surviving a lengthy filibuster. Hours later, a twin-engine plane carrying Sens. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., and Birch Bayh, D-Ind., crashed near Springfield, Massachusetts. Kennedy was seriously injured, Bayh and his wife, Marvella, less so, but two people, including the pilot, were killed.

On This Date:
In 1764, Jose Gervasio Artigas, considered the father of Uruguayan independence, was born in Montevideo.
In 1864, during the Civil War, the Confederate sloop-of-war CSS Alabama was sunk by the USS Kearsarge (also a sloop-of-war) off Cherbourg, France.
In 1910, the first-ever Father's Day was celebrated in Spokane, Wash. (The idea for the observance is credited to Sonora Louise Smart Dodd.)
In 1934, the Federal Communications Commission was created; it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.
In 1938, four dozen people were killed when a railroad bridge in Montana collapsed, sending a train known as the Olympian hurtling into Custer Creek.
In 1944, during World War II, the two-day Battle of the Philippine Sea began, resulting in a decisive victory for the Americans over the Japanese.
In 1953, Julius Rosenberg, 35, and his wife, Ethel, 37, convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, were executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York.
In 1964, a groundbreaking ceremony took place in Concord, California, for the Bay Area Rapid Transit system, with President Lyndon B. Johnson presiding.
In 1972, Hurricane Agnes, blamed for at least 122 deaths, made landfall over the Florida Panhandle.
In 1986, University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias, the first draft pick of the Boston Celtics, suffered a fatal cocaine-induced seizure. Artificial heart recipient Murray P. Haydon died in Louisville, Kentucky, after 16 months on the manmade pump.
In 1999, author Stephen King was seriously injured when he was struck by a van driven by Bryan Smith in North Lovell, Maine. Britain's Prince Edward married commoner Sophie Rhys-Jones in Windsor, England.

Ten years ago:
The U.S. military stepped up its campaign against militant leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, launching an airstrike that pulverized a suspected hideout in Fallujah. President George W. Bush told Americans in his weekly radio address that the economy was growing stronger and more jobs were being created despite Democrats' claim he'd presided over a downturn for the country.

Five years ago:
New York Times reporter David S. Rohde and Afghan reporter Tahir Ludin escaped from militant captors after more than seven months in captivity in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Texas billionaire R. Allen Stanford was indicted and jailed on charges his international banking empire was really just a Ponzi scheme built on lies, bluster and bribery. (Stanford was sentenced to 110 years in prison after being convicted of bilking investors in a $7.2 billion scheme that involved the sale of fraudulent certificates of deposits.)

One year ago:
Afghan President Hamid Karzai suspended talks with the United States on a new security deal to protest the way his government was left out of initial peace negotiations with the Taliban. President Barack Obama, speaking in front of Berlin's Brandenburg Gate, pledged to cut deployed U.S. nuclear weapons by one-third if Cold War foe Russia did the same. Actor James Gandolfini, 51, died while vacationing in Rome. Country singer Slim Whitman, 90, died in Orange Park, Florida.

Today's Birthdays:
Pop singer Tommy DeVito (The Four Seasons) is 86. Actress Gena (JEH'-nuh) Rowlands is 84. Hall of Fame race car driver Shirley Muldowney is 74. Singer Spanky McFarlane (Spanky and Our Gang) is 72. Nobel peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi (soo chee) is 69. Author Salman Rushdie is 67. Actress Phylicia Rashad is 66. Rock singer Ann Wilson (Heart) is 64. Musician Larry Dunn is 61. Actress Kathleen Turner is 60. Country singer Doug Stone is 58. Singer Mark DeBarge is 55. Singer-dancer Paula Abdul is 52. Actor Andy Lauer is 51. Rock singer-musician Brian Vander Ark (Verve Pipe) is 50. Actress Mia Sara is 47. Rock musician Brian "Head" Welch is 44. Actor Jean Dujardin is 42. Actress Robin Tunney is 42. Actor Bumper Robinson is 40. Actress Poppy Montgomery is 39. Alt-country singer-musician Scott Avett (The Avett Brothers) is 38. Actor Ryan Hurst is 38. Actress Zoe Saldana is 36. Actress Lauren Lee Smith is 34. Rapper Macklemore (Macklemore and Ryan Lewis) is 31. Actor Paul Dano is 30. Actor Atticus Shaffer is 16.

Thought for Today:
"To seek fulfillment is to invite frustration." - Jiddu Krishnamurti, Indian author and philosopher (1895-1986).




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