Flu Symptoms





Is It A Cold Or Is It The Flu?

The flu and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses. Because these two types of illnesses have similar flu-like symptoms, it can be difficult to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms such as fever, body aches, extreme tiredness, and dry cough are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems, such as pneumonia, bacterial infections, or hospitalizations.

How Can You Tell The Difference?

Because colds and flu share many symptoms, it can be difficult (or even impossible) to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. Special tests that usually must be done within the first few days of illness can be carried out, when needed to tell if a person has the flu.

How Do The Symptoms Compare?

In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms such as fever, body aches, extreme tiredness, and dry cough are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems, such as pneumonia, bacterial infections, or hospitalizations.

Influenza Symptoms
Influenza (also known as the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms:

· Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
· Cough
· Sore throat
· Runny or stuffy nose
· Muscle or body aches
· Headaches
· Fatigue (tiredness)
· Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

(* It's important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.)

Flu Complications
Most people who get influenza will recover in a few days to less than two weeks, but some people will develop complications (such as pneumonia) as a result of the flu, some of which can be life threatening and result in death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, and sinus and ear infections are three examples of complications from flu. The flu can make chronic health problems worse. For example, people with asthma may experience asthma attacks while they have the flu, and people with chronic congestive heart failure may have worsening of this condition that is triggered by the flu.

Emergency Warning Signs In Children

· Fast breathing or trouble breathing
· Bluish skin color
· Not drinking enough fluids
· Not waking up or not interacting
· Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
· Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough
· Fever with a rash
· In addition to the signs above, get medical help right away for any infant who has any of these signs:
· Being unable to eat
· Has trouble breathing
· Has no tears when crying
· Significantly fewer wet diapers than normal

Emergency Warning Signs In Adults

· Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
· Sudden dizziness
· Confusion
· Severe or persistent vomiting
· Flu-like symptoms that improve but then return with fever and worse cough

People At Higher Risk

Anyone can get the flu (even healthy people), and serious problems from influenza can happen at any age, but some people are at higher risk of developing serious flu-related complications if they get sick. This includes people 65 years and older, people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), pregnant women, and young children.

Flu Severity
Flu is unpredictable and how severe it is can vary widely from one season to the next depending on many things, including:

· What flu viruses are spreading,
· How much flu vaccine is available
· When vaccine is available
· How many people get vaccinated, and
· How well the flu vaccine is matched to flu viruses that are causing illness.

One study found that during the 1990s, flu-related deaths in the United States ranged from an estimated 17,000 during the mildest season to 52,000 during the most severe season (36,000 average). Over a period of 31 seasons between 1976 and 2007, estimates of flu-associated deaths in the United States range from a low of about 3,000 to a high of about 49,000 people. During a regular flu season, about 90 percent of deaths occur in people 65 years and older.

(Source: U.S. Centers For Disease Control And Prevention)





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