Advertisement

Questions about J&J vaccine could affect perceptions of COVID vaccines generally

Questions that surfaced about Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine after six women developed...
Questions that surfaced about Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine after six women developed rare, but severe blood clots after getting shots may affect perceptions of COVID-19 vaccines generally, a doctor says. (File)(KBTX)
Published: Apr. 14, 2021 at 7:11 PM CDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

(KWTX) - Questions that surfaced about Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine after six women developed rare, but severe blood clots after getting shots may affect perceptions of COVID-19 vaccines generally, a doctor says.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Tuesday recommended pausing use of the vaccine, and members of a CDC advisory committee said Wednesday they would need a week to 10 days to review data before making a recommendation about the vaccine.

The pause and the review likely will impact public perception of COVID-19 vaccines, Dr. Jonathan Baktari, CEO of e7health.com, said.

“On one hand it’s probably going to impact people who were already hesitant, but if it does come back and people feel certain that it’s been looked at it could increase confidence, so I think it could go either way,” Baktari said.

He says the Johnson & Johnson vaccine uses a science similar to AstraZeneca’s vaccine, which is completely different from what’s used in the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines.

Those vaccinated with either Moderna’s or Pfizer’s vaccines don’t need to worry about the Johnson & Johnson review, he said.

As the CDC and FDA investigate, he says they’ll likely come to the conclusion that certain age groups or genders should avoid that specific vaccine provider.

The six women, who range in age from 18 to 48, developed clots from between six and 13 days after getting shots.

Two women in Central Texas to whom KWTX spoke both got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine more than 13 days ago, and neither experienced adverse effects.

Rene Groppe says she and her husband have upcoming travel plans, so they each did research to decide what vaccine to choose.

Her husband chose Moderna, while she chose Johnson & Johnson, because she says she doesn’t like getting shots so the one and done option was more appealing to her.

Even after hearing about the blood clots, she says her opinion would not change.

“Those stats right there wouldn’t scare me to take it. If I had not taken the Johnson & Johnson, I’d still take it,” Groppe said.

Emily Nulph, meanwhile, says the pause on use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine does not deter her from getting vaccinated against the virus, but she says if she had been given the option, she would have chosen a different vaccine.

“It might only be a small percentage, but I have a family history of blood clots, and there are two other options out there that have not yet come up with this side effect that I could have chosen and would have chosen if I had known,” Nulph said.

VACCINE INFORMATION AND RESOURCES

Copyright 2021 KWTX. All rights reserved.