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Weather makes hot spots, flare ups a constant problem as crews battle Crittenberg Complex Fire at Fort Hood

The weather is making hot spots and flare ups a constant problem at Fort Hood as crews continue...
The weather is making hot spots and flare ups a constant problem at Fort Hood as crews continue to battle the Crittenberg Complex Fire.(Eric Franklin for KWTX)
Published: Apr. 7, 2022 at 5:41 PM CDT
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FORT HOOD, Texas (KWTX) - The Crittenberg Complex Fire is technically 95 percent contained on post but the prevailing weather conditions are making hot spots and flares ups a constant problem for firefighters.

Low humidity and winds of more than 30 miles per hour are the perfect combination for turning smoldering embers into dangerous fires.

Thursday afternoon, a range control officer reported a brush fire near the OTR range on the north east part of the post.

Multiple Fort Hood crews were immediately called in to attack the fire.

“This is what we’re dealing with now at Fort Hood. These hot spots will continue to be a problem until we get a lot of rain,” said Fort Hood Fire Chief Andrew Lima.

At the same time the OTR fire flared, another small fire sparked several miles to the south.

The Killeen Fire Department was called in to help with that fire.

“The cooperation we’ve gotten from surrounding departments and the people of central Texas has been amazing,” Lima said.

The Fort Hood fire chief called in for an air drop utilizing helicopters at around 3 p.m. Thursday.

Crews battling the Crittenberg Complex Fire at Fort Hood.
Crews battling the Crittenberg Complex Fire at Fort Hood.(Eric Franklin for KWTX)

“The helicopters help us reach areas that we can’t get to on the ground,” Lima said.

“We will hit this with everything we have because we don’t want this getting out of control.”

Fort Hood is home to more than 195,000 acres of training ranges, featuring a mix of brush, small and medium sized trees, and grass.

Firefighters here see no end in sight to long days and sleepless nights trying to keep wildfires under control .

“We need about a week of steady rain,” Lima said.

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