Area Army recruiters needing new uniforms fit for free by master tailor

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WACO, Texas (KWTX) A master tailor has been 'drafted' to help Waco Army recruiters look sharp as the U.S. Army makes a change.

Master tailor Roxana Robles donates her services to measure a Waco Army recruiter for the U.S. Army's reinstatement of the Greens Uniform. (Army photo)

A nod to what was worn by the "Greatest Generation" and the Army's heritage, the military branch is in the process of reinstating the Greens Uniform from the WWII-era.

Some of the first to test the new, old dress uniforms are recruiting units like the one in Waco.

"The Army is going back to the 'pinks and greens,'" said Sgt. First Class Adam Boentgen. "It's more like what my dad and my grandfather wore, so to me, having a history of military in my family, I really like having something that they had."

Boentgen has been a recruiter in the Waco office since January and says he can't wait to show off the uniform they got measured for last week thanks to tailor Roxana Robles.

"There's a lot involved with all the measurements because they have to actually measure your wrist, your hand, because we're going to get specialty gloves made," said Boentgen. "Elbows, legs, everything is completely custom."

With a total of about 17 measurements for 11 Waco Army recruiters, several businesses turned them down.

"At the end of the day, all of us in the office getting our measurements was going to be a good amount of money--if somebody in the community is willing to help us out, that's always a plus," said Staff Sgt. Jose Soto.

Robles, an acquaintance of Sotos, came to the rescue.

"I knew that she was, I guess you could say, a famous tailor here in Waco," said Soto.

Robles, who has worked with everyone from RG3 to Joanna Gaines, felt it was her duty to make the troops look flawless.

"These uniforms are made by their own company, but they need to be perfect," said Robles, the owner of Courture Tailoring by Roxana Robles.

The fitting didn't cost the soldiers a dime.

"This is the way for me to say 'thank you for your service,'" said Robles. "They sacrifice a lot for us, so this is nothing from me."

Typically, soldiers go to a military alteration shop, however, the closest is Ft. Hood.

"We don't have a military base that's relatively easy to get to, so we had to find a civilian alterations place that could measure us," said Boentgen.

Now that their measurements have been sent in, it can take between one to three months to get the uniforms.

"It gives me a sense of joy I guess you would say, mainly because there's not that many people that support us, and for those people that do support us, it shows that people actually care for the people that are in the military," said Soto.

Robles, an immigrant from Monterrey, Mexico who came to America 23 years ago, says she cares about the military deeply.

"I love this country," said Robles. "It's my second home."

While she wasn't made in America, the mother of three--who's been running her own tailoring business in Waco for more than a decade--is making America look good...one stitch at a time.

With a goal of perfection, Robles hopes her measurements for these soldiers measure up to the pride she has for those who represent the United States to the rest of the world.

"I told them, 'can I have a picture with you guys when you have your uniforms?' Because it makes you proud," said Robles.

Soto, the first of his Hispanic family to join the military, says this will be the third uniform he's had to wear in nine years.

"Thank you so much," he says to Robles. "Thank you so much, muchas gracias."

Boentgen also had a message for Robles.

"Thank you so much ma'am, it really meant a lot to us to take time out of your day and I believe stay open past your normal hours to take care of our entire office as well," he said.

Robles says if her measurements were perfect, they won't have to return for alterations, however, if they need to or want to have her sew insignia, she's going to give them a discount.

The U.S. Army expects to have the uniform transition complete by July 2020, according to its website.