Central Texas city hits 2 milestones with black female mayor

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MARLIN, Texas (KWTX) History was made in Falls County Tuesday night--twice.

Carolyn Lofton made history when she was sworn-in Tuesday night as the new Mayor for the City of Marlin. (Photo by Rissa Shaw)

The City of Marlin not only now has it's first female black Mayor, Carolyn Lofton is the first black person who has ever held the office, according to city officials.

It was made official during the swearing-in ceremony at Tuesday night's regularly scheduled council meeting where well over one-hundred supporters packed Marlin City Hall to celebrate the milestones for minorities.

According to 2018 U.S. census data, more than 41 percent of Marlin's nearly 6,000 people were black or African American.

"My goal is to unite the citizens of Marlin around issues that need to be corrected here in Marlin, work together as a team to get these things corrected and let's make Marlin a great place to live again," said Lofton.

Lofton handedly unseated incumbent Mayor John Keefer in the May 4 Election.

Precinct 1 incumbent Susan Byrd also lost her place to newcomer Max Martinez, as did Precinct 5 councilman Curtis Smith to Neddie Moore.

Precinct 3 councilman Terrence McDavid retained his seat.

Along with Lofton, Martinez, Moore, and McDavid were all sworn-in to office Tuesday night.

"I'm feeling really pumped," Lofton told KWTX. "I'm feeling it's going to be a really positive council, we're going to work together and get things done."

Lofton's first official duty as Mayor of Marlin was signing the employment contract of new City Manager, Cedric David Sr., who, earlier in the evening, the previous council voted unanimously to hire.

Lofton says her second order of business will be to turn the town around.

"I want people to know that Marlin is one community, one family, and we have one goal and that's to get Marlin restored, refurbished, and back to the great city that it's always been," said Lofton. "We're Marlin strong."

The new mayor said she was going to take up streets, water, the city charter, and economic development.

"We definitely want to get the infrastructure repaired," said Lofton.