Temple: City wants input on growth

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TEMPLE, Texas (KWTX) Over the next three weeks, Temple is inviting the public to provide input on the city’s future.

(Photo by Megan Vanselow)

Officials will review a comprehensive plan, which is a blueprint to guide growth in the community that addresses land use, transportation and economic development.

It provides city council and staff with a resource for policies on growth over the next 10 years, inspired in large part by public input.

At the meetings, people will have an opportunity to review maps and graphics to provide input on how they want Temple to grow, or on amenities and trails they would like to see in their parks.

A joint public kick-off event is scheduled from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Sammons Community Center at 2220 West Ave. D.

An open house on a parks & trails master plan is from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on May 30 at the Wilson Recreation Center at 2205 Curtis B. Elliott.

A session on the comprehensive plan is scheduled from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on June 4 at the Gober Party House at 1516 West Ave. H.

The comprehensive plan session will include information on projects such as City Eats, Santa Fe Plaza, Santa Fe Market Trail, the redevelopment of Hawn Hotel, Arcadia and Sears Building.

The operators of longtime businesses downtown say they’re happy to see the growth, especially for new parking garages planned.

“The parking downtown is always been one of the number one complains at least for my customers.” Eric Jones, manager of The Green Door said.

The parking garages will be constructed at the intersection of 1st Street/Avenue A and 4th Street/Central Avenue.

The cost of the two projects, which will provide more than 600 parking spaces, totals $13 million.

Local businesses say the changes coming all throughout the city are exciting.

“We have been here for a long time and we have been seeing it grow little by little and so we are so excited for this. I can't wait until it's done.” Ledia Harwell, part owner of Pignetti’s said.

“More businesses downtown means more people know about it, Facebook gets going, Twitter, so I think it's going to be great for downtown.” Jones said.