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Waco: Local official encouraged by peaceful weekend protest

"It was very encouraging to see the young people out," Pct. 2 McLennan County Commissioner said Monday. (Photo by Drake Lawson)
"It was very encouraging to see the young people out," Pct. 2 McLennan County Commissioner said Monday. (Photo by Drake Lawson)(KWTX)
Published: Jun. 1, 2020 at 6:58 PM CDT
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A local official says she was encouraged as hundreds protested Sunday afternoon and evening in Waco over the death of George Floyd, who gasped that he couldn’t breathe as a Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee on his neck.

"It was very encouraging to see the young people out," Pct. 2 McLennan County Commissioner said Monday.

She said she was impressed the community remained peaceful during the protest, which hasn’t been the case in other cities across the U.S.

"The image of Central Texans kneeling and all of those young people of different cultures, when you lay that on the landscape of the violence we are seeing across the country it would make anyone in McLennan County proud," Miller said.

"This issue is not a black and white issue, it’s a rights for black issue," says Miller.

"The take-away from yesterday should be that we need all of us on the side of right," she says.

"We all need to stand up against an issue that we clearly see is wrong."

Dr. Mia Moody-Ramirez, the chairman of the Baylor University Department of Journalism, Public Relations and New Media, echoed those thoughts, happy that members of the community were able to express their grief and anger in a nonviolent way.

"I think it is very important to remain peaceful, I certainly don’t encourage people to loot," says Moody-Ramirez, who has done extensive research on racial stereotypes and social media.

But she says it isn't surprising that other communities are seeing more extreme protests.

"I do understand where that anger comes from and they feel this is the only way that they can express it," she says.

The racial protests of the Civil Rights Era were also fueled by anger and frustration, but the rise of social media has changed the dynamic dramatically.

"This isn't the protests from the 1960's,” she said.

“With social media people are seeing images all over the U.S. and the world," she said.

"Now that you've seen the person that is killed you ask ‘what can we do here? What can I do in Waco?’"

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