Two area counties among just a few in Texas to escape COVID-19

San Saba County, with about 5,800 residents, remains virus free, and San Saba’s mayor, Ken Jordan, says officials are doing everything they can to keep their community informed and prepared. (City of San Saba photo/file)
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SAN SABA, Texas (KWTX) Two counties in Central Texas are among 35 of the state’s 254 counties in which the new coronavirus has not gained a foothold.

The Texas Department of State Health Services listed one confirmed case in Mills County earlier this week and then dropped it from the official count after learning that the resident didn’t test positive for the virus, but instead got an antibody test that indicated infection sometime in the past.

Neighboring San Saba County, with about 5,800 residents, also remains virus free, and San Saba’s mayor, Ken Jordan, says officials are doing everything they can to keep their community informed and prepared.

“We gathered weekly with a medical group here, our judge and pharmacist making sure we had everything prepared for the nursing home or any kind of outbreak we could have here, making sure we had enough supplies and all that,” Jordan said.

“We are still very, very cautious,” he said.

“You never know, it could be here. We may have had a case or two, but nobody had the symptoms,” Jordan said.

Jordan says several members of the community were tested for COVID-19, but the tests all came back negative.

San Saba resident Jana Lackey says everyone has been taking the COVID-19 guidelines seriously.

“Everyone has been staying home and following curfews,” Lackey said.

Lackey believes God has heard her community's prayers.

“We do have a lot of praying over our county and I have a feeling it has a lot to do with that,” she said.

“It’s a wonderful feeling [not having any COVID-19 cases],” Lackey said.

The virus began to surface in Texas at the same time San Saba residents were scrambling to create temporary quarters for the town’s only full-service grocery store, which was destroyed by fire on March 20.

The store, set up in temporary quarters, attracted shoppers from outside of the town of about 3,000 residents, raising concerns about the possible spread of the virus.

“People were coming from Austin, Houston and even Dallas to shop since there were limited essential items at stores,” Lackey said,